THM

mrhlms:

So he sank to the bottom of the pool he didn’t even try to swim.

straight couple: *make out in public at random intervals in weird places*
straight couple: *grabs each other's asses in public*
straight couple: *are not in any way inconspicuous about the fact that they are feeling each other up in public*
gay couple: *holds hands in public*
straight people: that is VILE and it is CORRUPTING my entire FAMILY. my grandmother is crying. my children have all shit their pants at the same time. WHO WILL THINK OF THE CHILDREN

art history meme | 4/7 sculptures/other media: Winged Victory of Samothrace (Nike of Samothrace) (200-190B.C.)
The Nike of Samothrace, discovered in 1863, is estimated to have been created around 200-190 BC. It is 8ft (2.44m) high. It was created to not only honor the goddess, Nike, but to honor a sea battle. It conveys a sense of action and triumph as well as portraying artful flowing drapery through its features which the Greeks considered ideal beauty. It stood on a rostral pedestal of gray marble from Lartos representing the prow of a ship (most likely a trihemiolia), and represents the goddess as she descends from the skies to the triumphant fleet. Before she lost her arms, which have never been recovered, Nike’s right arm is believed to have been raised, cupped round her mouth to deliver the shout of Victory. The work is notable for its convincing rendering of a pose where violent motion and sudden stillness meet, for its graceful balance and for the rendering of the figure’s draped garments, compellingly depicted as if rippling in a strong sea breeze. The Nike of Samothrace is seen as an iconic depiction of triumphant spirit and of the divine momentarily coming face to face with man. It is possible, however, that the power of the work is enhanced by the very fact that the head is missing.

art history meme | 4/7 sculptures/other media: Winged Victory of Samothrace (Nike of Samothrace) (200-190B.C.)

The Nike of Samothrace, discovered in 1863, is estimated to have been created around 200-190 BC. It is 8ft (2.44m) high. It was created to not only honor the goddess, Nike, but to honor a sea battle. It conveys a sense of action and triumph as well as portraying artful flowing drapery through its features which the Greeks considered ideal beauty. It stood on a rostral pedestal of gray marble from Lartos representing the prow of a ship (most likely a trihemiolia), and represents the goddess as she descends from the skies to the triumphant fleet. Before she lost her arms, which have never been recovered, Nike’s right arm is believed to have been raised, cupped round her mouth to deliver the shout of Victory. The work is notable for its convincing rendering of a pose where violent motion and sudden stillness meet, for its graceful balance and for the rendering of the figure’s draped garments, compellingly depicted as if rippling in a strong sea breeze. The Nike of Samothrace is seen as an iconic depiction of triumphant spirit and of the divine momentarily coming face to face with man. It is possible, however, that the power of the work is enhanced by the very fact that the head is missing.

Christina Hendricks at the Cannes Film Festival

Eva Green by David Bellemere for The Edit Magazine

the-littlest-birdd:

dying-lotus:

carry-on-wayward-fallen-angel:

ladypaceofmirkwood:

Weight gain Tips From Chris Pratt

this man is a gift and we must cherish him

Me

chris pratt you are my life

dreadqueer:

Literally all she did was point out misognyistic tropes in a video games, and this is the aftermath. Men continually prove feminism correct and necessary.

dreadqueer:

Literally all she did was point out misognyistic tropes in a video games, and this is the aftermath. Men continually prove feminism correct and necessary.

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